Panelists

Robert A. Gatenby
MD Department Chair in Radiology
Co-Director Center of Excellence for Evolution Based Therapy

Bob received a B.S.E. in Bioengineering and Mechanical Sciences from Princeton University and an M.D. from the University of Pennsylvania. He completed his residency in radiology at the University of Pennsylvania where he also served as chief resident. Bob remains an active clinical radiologist specializing in body imaging. While working at the Fox Chase Cancer Center after residency, Bob perceived that cancer biology and oncology were awash in data but lacked coherent frameworks of understanding to organize this information and integrate new results. Reaching back to his training in engineering and physical sciences, Bob recognized that cancer was a complex dynamic system (similar, for example, to weather) and that understanding the often-non-linear interactions that govern such systems requires mathematical models and computer simulations. As a result, most of Bob’s subsequent research has focused on exploring mathematical methods to understand the first principles and key parameters that govern cancer biology and treatment. In 2008, Bob joined Moffitt as chair of radiology and convinced the leadership to add a group of mathematicians to the faculty and form the Integrated Mathematical Oncology (IMO) department. Now numbering 8 faculty mathematicians and over 20 post docs and grad students, the IMO has catalyzed formation of several disease-oriented teams of oncologists, surgeons, pathologists, radiologists, mathematicians, physicists, cancer biologists, imaging scientists and evolutionary biologists. These multidisciplinary groups are investigating virtually every aspect of cancer biology and therapy. In fact, IMO members are co-PIs of two ongoing clinical trials that use evolutionary dynamics and computational models to guide therapy. There is no other cancer center in the world that has so completely integrated mathematical modeling and computer simulations into basic science and clinical research.
Robert A. Gatenby
MD Department Chair in Radiology
Co-Director Center of Excellence for Evolution Based Therapy

Bob received a B.S.E. in Bioengineering and Mechanical Sciences from Princeton University and an M.D. from the University of Pennsylvania. He completed his residency in radiology at the University of Pennsylvania where he also served as chief resident. Bob remains an active clinical radiologist specializing in body imaging. While working at the Fox Chase Cancer Center after residency, Bob perceived that cancer biology and oncology were awash in data but lacked coherent frameworks of understanding to organize this information and integrate new results. Reaching back to his training in engineering and physical sciences, Bob recognized that cancer was a complex dynamic system (similar, for example, to weather) and that understanding the often-non-linear interactions that govern such systems requires mathematical models and computer simulations. As a result, most of Bob’s subsequent research has focused on exploring mathematical methods to understand the first principles and key parameters that govern cancer biology and treatment. In 2008, Bob joined Moffitt as chair of radiology and convinced the leadership to add a group of mathematicians to the faculty and form the Integrated Mathematical Oncology (IMO) department. Now numbering 8 faculty mathematicians and over 20 post docs and grad students, the IMO has catalyzed formation of several disease-oriented teams of oncologists, surgeons, pathologists, radiologists, mathematicians, physicists, cancer biologists, imaging scientists and evolutionary biologists. These multidisciplinary groups are investigating virtually every aspect of cancer biology and therapy. In fact, IMO members are co-PIs of two ongoing clinical trials that use evolutionary dynamics and computational models to guide therapy. There is no other cancer center in the world that has so completely integrated mathematical modeling and computer simulations into basic science and clinical research.


Ellison Institute Insights Forum Recordings

July 2021: In the context of the convergence of the physical sciences with cancer biology, is research in the physical sciences clinically relevant? What will it take to advance promising areas of the physical sciences to solve critical questions in cancer that could lead to clinical breakthroughs?
May 2021: We are awash in data from cancer patients, but if data are not information, what and where is dysregulated cancer information, how do we collect it and is it critical for the diagnosis and treatment of cancer?
March 2021: How could applying specific principles of evolution / evolutionary theory (and ecology) across biological and temporal scales of cancer revolutionize treatment strategies, reduce resistance, and improve patient outcomes?
January 2021:
 Can we use the precision cancer medicine model to inform and improve the diagnosis and prevention of COVID-19 infections and treatment of the disease(s) it causes?
Vaccination Records
Wear Sunscreen
Keep records of your vaccination history! Keeping personal copies of your vaccination history is very helpful, especially during disease outbreaks. If you don’t already have a copy, ask your doctor for a copy and put it somewhere safe, or somewhere in the Cloud. Knowing your vaccination history also helps remind you when you are due for boosters, or that you need to receive another vaccine. For more information, click here.
July 2021: In the context of the convergence of the physical sciences with cancer biology, is research in the physical sciences clinically relevant? What will it take to advance promising areas of the physical sciences to solve critical questions in cancer that could lead to clinical breakthroughs?
May 2021:
We are awash in data from cancer patients, but if data are not information, what and where is dysregulated cancer information, how do we collect it and is it critical for the diagnosis and treatment of cancer?
March 2021:
How could applying specific principles of evolution / evolutionary theory (and ecology) across biological and temporal scales of cancer revolutionize treatment strategies, reduce resistance, and improve patient outcomes?
January 2021:
Can we use the precision cancer medicine model to inform and improve the diagnosis and prevention of COVID-19 infections and treatment of the disease(s) it causes?
Vaccination Records
Keep records of your vaccination history! Keeping personal copies of your vaccination history is very helpful, especially during disease outbreaks. If you don’t already have a copy, ask your doctor for a copy and put it somewhere safe, or somewhere in the Cloud. Knowing your vaccination history also helps remind you when you are due for boosters, or that you need to receive another vaccine. For more information, click here.
Wear Sunscreen
Breast Cancer Screening 

A Short Guide to a Long Life

In his #1 New York Times bestselling book, The End of Illness, Dr. David B. Agus shared what he has learned from his work as a pioneering doctor and researcher, revealing the innovative steps he takes to prolong the lives of not only cancer patients but all those hoping to enjoy a vigorous, lengthy life. Now Dr. Agus has turned his analysis into a practical and concise illustrated handbook for everyday living. He believes optimal health begins with our daily habits. READ MORE

The End of Illness

What if everything you thought about health was wrong?
Can we live robustly until our last breath? Do we have to suffer from debilitating conditions and sickness? Is it possible to add more vibrant years to our lives? And has the time come for us to stop thinking about disease as something the body “gets” or “has” but rather to think of it as something the body does? READ MORE